AVONEX® (interferon beta-1a) Resources

Additional Resources

Committed to support

Treating your relapsing MS with AVONEX means gaining support. We're here to help you talk with your healthcare provider or nurse and discuss side effects that may occur while taking AVONEX.

Flu-like symptoms (FLS)

Most people who take AVONEX have flu-like symptoms early during the course of therapy as it is the most common side effect. Usually these symptoms last for a day after the injection. For many, they lessen or go away over time as their bodies adjust to AVONEX. FLS are reactions to your AVONEX injections that may include fever, chills, muscle aches, tiredness, or headache. Experiencing FLS doesn't mean you actually have the flu. These symptoms may be part of your body's natural response to interferon beta-1a.

There are steps you can take that may help to manage FLS in the meantime:

  • Stay well hydrated
  • Ask your healthcare provider about over-the-counter pain relievers you can try before and after taking your AVONEX
  • FLS may peak during different times for each individual. You may want to experiment with different times of the day for your injection. You may find that taking your AVONEX in the morning or afternoon is best
  • Keep a journal to note how long after your injection any side effects occur, how much water you drink, and any pain relievers you take
  • It's important to talk to your healthcare provider about any side effects you experience

If you are interested in speaking with a member of the ActiveNurse™ Educator staff about FLS, you can call 1-800-456-2255.

We're here to help

If you still have concerns, remember—you're not alone. You should always call your healthcare provider's office with any questions. You can also speak with an ActiveNurses™ Educator. These MS-trained nurse educators are available by phone 24/7 and are dedicated to making you feel more comfortable and confident with taking once-a-week AVONEX. Call an ActiveNurses™ Educator today at 1-800-456-2255 for answers to your questions about AVONEX or its side effects.

You can report side effects to the FDA online or by calling 1-800-FDA-1088.

Talking to your healthcare provider

Since relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) is a life-long condition, it's important to develop open and clear lines of communication with your neurologist.

About your neurologist: A neurologist specializes in treating diseases of the nervous system. He or she can give you a definitive diagnosis of MS based on an MRI scan, help monitor your symptoms over time, and recommend or prescribe the MS therapy that's right for you.

Make the most of each visit: The more information you can give your healthcare provider about your symptoms, flare-ups, and general health, the better equipped he or she will be to help treat your relapsing MS. Prepare questions before your visit and plan a conversation with your healthcare provider.

Before your appointment: Write down your questions, starting with the most important ones. Ask a friend or family member to go with you to take notes and share their perspective after the visit. And prepare a list of medications you are currently taking, including strength and dosing schedule.


Getting guidance and support to help with your
relapsing MS can make a positive difference. Start here.

* Depending on your income or, in some cases, if your medication is obtained from an out-of-network provider, there may be an annual cap that limits the amount of assistance that you can receive over one year. Additional restrictions apply.

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Important Safety Information and Indication

AVONEX can cause serious side effects. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the symptoms listed below while taking AVONEX.

Indication

AVONEX (interferon beta-1a) is approved by FDA to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) to decrease the number of flare-ups and slow the occurrence of some of the physical disability that is common in people with MS. AVONEX is approved for use in people who have experienced a first attack and have lesions consistent with MS on their MRI.

Important Safety Information

Before beginning treatment, you should discuss with your healthcare provider the potential benefits and risks associated with AVONEX.

AVONEX can cause serious side effects. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the symptoms listed below while taking AVONEX.

AVONEX will not cure your MS but may decrease the number of flare-ups of the disease and slow the occurrence of some of the physical disability that is common in people with MS. MS is a life-long disease that affects your nervous system by destroying the protective covering (myelin) that surrounds your nerve fibers.

The way AVONEX works in MS is not known. It is not known if AVONEX is safe and effective in children.

Do not take AVONEX if you are allergic to interferon beta, albumin (human), or any of the ingredients in AVONEX.

Before taking AVONEX, tell your healthcare provider if you:

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

AVONEX can cause serious side effects including:

Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the symptoms listed above.

The most common side effects of AVONEX include:

Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see the full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide for additional important safety information. This information is not intended to replace discussions with your healthcare provider.

Indication

AVONEX (interferon beta-1a) is approved by FDA to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) to decrease the number of flare-ups and slow the occurrence of some of the physical disability that is common in people with MS. AVONEX is approved for use in people who have experienced a first attack and have lesions consistent with MS on their MRI.